What would Reid Priddy do? How to follow the four-time Olympian's example this summer

by Jeff Smith

Reid Priddy's speech at the Serve City Volleyball Banquet was inspiring and uplifting in numerous ways. One of my favorite takeaways from his story of how he grew into a decorated four-time U.S. Olympian was how his perspective on volleyball changed shortly after first being introduced to the sport in middle school.

"I began playing volleyball all the time," Reid told our athletes, families and coaches at the banquet. "I couldn't play the sport enough."

Reid's love for the game drove him to play volleyball every chance he got: in open gyms, his backyard, on the sand, at parks, during camps and clinics and on his school's teams. He continued this habit into and throughout high school, college and the professional and Olympic ranks.

Now that most of Serve City's girls teams have wrapped up their seasons, you might be wondering what your daughter (or your son) can do next to continue fanning the flame of their love for volleyball. Following Reid Priddy's advice, here are four ideas to help your child keep developing their passion for the sport along with their skills and understanding of the game.

1. Play the sport recreationally.

Reid's love for the game grew largely out of playing the game with his friends outside of structured team practices and matches. This is also where your kids will learn the game more than any other venue. Volleyball requires countless hours of play in order to learn how to read your opponent -- looking across the net to determine when your opponent is hitting vs. tipping, where they are going to hit or pass the ball to before they even contact the ball, where they are setting to and where and how they are serving. This massive amount of information can only be instinctively learned through game play.

Plus, playing pick-up games of 6v6, 4v4, 3v3, 2v2 and even 1v1 will refine and sharpen your daughter's or son's all-around skills and ability to make split-second decisions, the latter of which is a crucial skill in and of itself in volleyball. And, of course, playing the game will stoke your child's passion and appreciation for the sport.

2. Attend summer camps.

Participating in summer camps is an excellent option for a couple of reasons. It exposes your daughter and son to new coaches and different and fresh teaching methods than they have received during their club and school seasons. Camps also give your child new ideas on how to pass, set, hit, block, defend and execute other volleyball skills that they can then take home and work on when they play recreationally this summer.

3. Try something new.

After several months of club volleyball and possibly two or three months of school ball, your daughter or son may need a fresh take on the sport to maintain her interest and refresh her love for the game. A fresh spin may come in a few different forms:

  • Trying sand volleyball. Playing in the sand is a terrific complement to the indoor version of the sport. Sand volleyball is significantly different from indoor in terms of rules, skills employed and strategy and tactics, not to mention the venue. Taking part in sand can improve your son or daughter's all-around skills, quickness, leaping ability and the skill of reading your opponent across the net while providing a refreshing new angle on the sport they love. (If you're interested in sand volleyball training this summer, here is a subsidiary organization running sand volleyball classes in the western suburbs.)
  • Taking private lessons. Summer is a good opportunity for some athletes to train individually with a private coach, as they can hone in on specific skills they need to learn or sharpen and raise their level of play prior to the start of the upcoming school season.
  • Competing in sand and grass tournaments. Both outdoor versions of the sport are popular in the Chicago area.
  • Learning a new position. One of my former players at the club where I coached prior to joining Serve City decided to play beach volleyball one summer so she could expand her game. Due to her height and frame, she had been pegged by her club coaches as strictly a middle blocker, so she joined a sand program to work on her serve receive and defensive skills in an effort to grow into an outside hitter for her senior season of club. My older daughter did the same thing, hitting the sand to improve her passing skills the summer after eighth grade and transition into a libero in high school.

5. Pay it forward.

Has your daughter or son benefited from years of coaching, instruction and input through club and school teams? This spring and summer they can begin giving back to the game by volunteering their time. They could serve as a volunteer assistant with a YMCA or park district league or help out at local camps for elementary-school kids. Paying it forward will keep them involved in volleyball while teaching them the other side of the game and perhaps sparking a future interest in coaching.

Even if they don't take to coaching, teaching the game to younger children will help your child develop a greater understanding of the sport and improve their volleyball IQ for their next season as a volley athlete.

Jeff Smith is Serve City's volleyball region director.